Friday Fisking: WW and ERVs

Yes, it’s the return of Friday Fisking. My first target is a chap calling himself William Wallace over at ERV. Some time ago, William left a comment in which he expressed skepticism that ERV data is justifiably used to support common descent. About a week later, he announced that he had made a model based on random insertion, and then asked for some help in creating an equivalent common descent model, with an aside that the results of the random model “doesn’t look good for your side.” This announcement was met with great derision, with calls for William to explain his conclusion. I directly addressed his question about his common descent model, pointing out where his assumption was incorrect. Even so, I remained puzzled as to how he achieved the results he claimed for both models.

Recently, it was brought up in relation to another post about ERVs. Although William refused to give any details about his model, he claimed that his results were unsurprising if you understood that math. He eventually offered to give me details via email. After a series of exchanges, I received enough information to be confident about the basics of his model.

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Friday Fisking – The Fafarman Files #1

This is the first in a series of posts analyzing Larry Fafarman’s 20 criticisms of Judge Jones’ decision in Kitzmiller v. Dover.  It was originally posted at Larry’s blog on June 2, 2006.  I have made some edits.

 (1) For perhaps only the second time in American history (the Selman v. Cobb County evolution-disclaimer textbook sticker case was possibly the first), a judge ruled that something — irreducible complexity in this case — that makes no mention of anything related to religion and that contains no religious symbols constitutes a government endorsement of religion. Whether or not irreducible complexity is bogus science is irrelevant, because there is no constitutional separation of bogus science and state.

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Friday Fisking

A weekly feature, often done on Fridays, has long been a staple of blogs.  Who am I to deny the tradition?  Each week, I will provide a detailed analysis of someone missing the point.

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